Things Girl Scout Juniors Can Do


Things To Do with Girl Scout Brownies | Things Girl Scout Cadettes Can Do

 

Working with Juniors?

 

Bronze AwardBronze Award Requirements — Read the full requirements and then challenge yourself by going for the Bronze, the highest award a Junior can earn! A girl must be in 4th or 5th grade, a registered Girl Scout Junior, and have completed a Junior Journey.

Use this to: Explain the award and how Juniors team up to make a difference in the community, country or world.

What girls get from this: Girls are more likely to earn their Gold Award if they’ve earned their Bronze award. Provides complete guidelines to earning the award. Earning the award provides fun while learning team work, goal setting, time management, and project planning. Girls feel good about making an impact! Deepens self-knowledge and helps girls identify strengths, skills, and talents. Creates opportunities to meet people and improve interpersonal skills.

Where: troop meetings; home; library, service centers, and other places with access to ForGirls.

 

Design Your Eco Dream HouseDesign Your Eco Dream House — Have a vision for your dream house? Doing the Get Moving! Journey? Put the two together and have fun choosing your home (city or country? chic apartment or big farmhouse?) while learning about energy and the planet.

Use this to: Connect with Get Moving!: Investigate Your Spaces, page 61; Energy audit, page 68; Carbon footprint, page 16; and Dream Up Your Green Home, page 63. Tie to Entertainment Tech and Product Designer badges and Girl Scout Forever Green activities. Encourage Girl Scout care of the Earth. Connect to the Girl Scout Law: use resources wisely.

What girls get from this: Provides fun way to learn about energy use–personal, family, community, country, world. Encourages girls’ interest in science, environment, design, and engineering. Stimulates creativity.

Where: troop meetings; home; library, service centers, and other places with access to ForGirls.

 

Girl Scouts Speak Out!Girl Scouts Speak Out! — Speak Out is our Public Service Announcement (PSA) contest. We want you to think about an issue important to you that fits within the theme of the contest, make a PSA about it, and submit it here. A PSA based on the winning entry for each theme will be professionally produced by GSUSA.

Use this to: Encourage self-expression, action, teamwork, creativity, technical skills, and understanding one’s interests. Also encourages observation as girls look around and note what they want to change. Ties to Journeys, in particular Agent of Change where the power of one, team, and community is stressed as well as Dream Team trading cards, page 20 and Power of Words page 25.

What girls get from this: Stimulates creativity and thinking about issues girls care about. Encourages team work and the Connect key as girls work together to produce the video, slideshow, or script. Increases self-esteem and confidence as girls recognize the power of their own voices.

Where you can do this: Troop meetings; during Series workshops, meeting, or events; camp; and most anywhere: outdoors, in nature settings: beach, rooftop, and backyard.

 

Inspiring Women TimelineInspiring Women Timeline — Get inspired and learn about the amazing accomplishments of diverse women throughout history!

Use this to: Connect Juniors to the Journeys, in particular aMUSE, which encourages girls to think about the roles they play and stories to tell about their experiences.

Also, link girls to the Agent of Change Journey and use this activity to guide them in completing steps towards the Power of One Award which asks girls to learn about an inspiring woman. Complements “Looking Back at Herstory,” pages 17-22.

What girls get from this: Inspires girls to think about their accomplishments and strengths. Provides positive “women in leadership” role models. Encourages girls to learn about history, read stories about women, and use computer skills.

Where you can do this: Troop meetings; during Series workshops or events; camp; library, and at home — anywhere with access to the internet.

 

Create a KaleidoscopeCreate a Kaleidoscope — Every kaleidoscope has a unique pattern. Make your own!

Use this to: Encourage Juniors to investigate art, physics, and movement. Tie into Leadership Journeys, in particular, page 64 of Get Moving! to expand on examples of building art and design. Activity ties to Drawing, Entertainment Technology, Digital Photography, and Product Designer badges. The idea of a kaleidoscope as a mixture of colors and change can be tied into the diversity of people and girls changing as they grow.

What girls get from this: Stimulates interest in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM). Supports artistic and creative expression.

Where you can use this: Meetings, (can work on laptops, tablets), outside, at camp. Can bring in artists, designers, scientists (to explain how light and angles interact to create effect).

 

My PlanetMy Planet — Play My Planet and put your eco skills to the test! What can you do every day to help the Earth?

Use this to: Increase girls’ knowledge on simple ways to protect the planet and save energy–at home and community. They can learn about recycling, saving water, planting trees, and growing vegetable gardens. Connect girls to Get Moving! Energy Audit, page 70; Biking, Walking, Carpooling page 76; Zipcars page 84. Also, activity ties to Agent of Change and ways to promote environmental action.

What girls get from this: Stimulates interest in environment and Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM). Teaches healthy, energy-saving habits girls can share with friends and family. Provides a fun activity that can jump-start discussion about the environment, outdoor pursuits, and careers.

Where you can use this: Meetings, (can work on laptops, tablets), outside, at camp. (Observations about ways to take care of planet can happen indoors or out.)

 

Print & Play – Character CardsPrint & Play –- Character Cards — Do you want to be an astronaut? Firefighter? Race car driver? Our character cards let you try out new roles!

Use this to: Encourage girls to think big as they role-play styles, careers, and characters in a safe environment. Ties to the aMuse Leadership Journey: Storytelling with a Purpose, page 38; Thinking Like a Storyteller, page 52; Inner Confidence, Outer Style page 62 and Playing the Past badge.

What girls get from this: Encourages communication, speaking, and relationship-building skills. Reflects Discover Outcome: Girls develop a strong sense of self. Supports career exploration.

Where you can use this: Meetings, (can work on laptops, tablets), camp, and recruitment events. Girls can do activity with younger girls.

 

Print & Play -- Scene SpinnerPrint & Play — Scene Spinner — Create and perform your own plays with the Scene Spinner!

Use this to: Connect girls with Journeys, in particular, aMuse: Storytelling with a Purpose, page 38; Trading Roles page 60; Thinking Like a Storyteller page 52. Also ties to Playing the Past badge.

What girls get from this: Encourages public speaking, team building, and relationship-building skills. Stimulates creativity: girls have to think on their feet, use their imaginations, and play a role. Reflects Discover Outcome: Girls develop a strong sense of self.

Where you can use this: Meetings, camp, recruitment events. Can be done almost anywhere easily as there are almost no materials, just scenes.

 

Print & Play -- Girls Are Supposed to Be...Print & Play — Girls Are Supposed to Be… — Play a game of “Mirror, mirror” with friends to find out who you are and who you want to become!

Use this to: Encourage girls to reflect on their abilities, talents, and strengths as well as qualities they want to improve. Connects with Journeys: Agent of Change—Looking Back on Herstory page 17; The Real Me, page 24; Dream Team trading cards page 20 and aMuse—Favorite Characters page 12; All my Roles Paper Dolls page 22; Talk About Roles page 28; My Role Call Log page 58; Trading Rolls page 60; Inner Critic page 72.and Playing the Past, Independence, and Business Owner badges. Also ties to Girl Scout Promise and Law and the Inspiring Women Timeline.

What girls get from this: Reflects Discover Outcome: Girls develop a strong sense of self. Develops critical thinking as girls debunk biases about gender roles, portrayal of girls and women in the media, and themselves. Encourages girls to explore the world and assess where they fit.

Where you can use this: Meetings, camp, series and workshop events.

 

Print & Play -- Power PennantsPrint & Play — Power Pennants — Do some words make you feel like you can do anything? Draw, paint, or make a collage of your “power words” on these pennants!

Use this to: Guide girls in recognizing the power of their own self-expression. Ties to Journeys, in particular Agent of Change—What Makes Me Me? page 13; The Power of Words page 25; Real Power, Real Girl Scouts page 29; aMUSE page 18; and Scribe badge.

What girls get from this: Reflects Discover Outcome: Girls develop a strong sense of self. Supports artistic and creative expression. Encourages communication, team building, and relationship-building skills.

Where you can use this: Meetings, camp, workshop events, and celebrations.

 

Map It! Girls Changing the WorldMap It! Girls Changing the World — Ready to earn your Bronze Award? Visit the interactive map and see how Girl Scouts all over are changing the world! Browse what other girls are doing to get inspiration, then share your project with us!

Use this to: Explain the impact of Girl Scout Bronze Award and Take Action projects.

What girls get from this: Inspires understanding of the worldwide sisterhood and impact of their project. Provokes ideas for Bronze Award and Take Action projects. If posting, provides a fun, satisfying culmination to an important leadership-building experience.

Where you can use this: troop meetings; home; library, and other places with access to ForGirls.

 

Things To Do with Girl Scout Brownies | Things Girl Scout Cadettes Can Do